How much water should you drink?

Nearly half of us don’t drink enough water! So grab a glass or water bottle as we look at how much you should be drinking, ways of keeping track and the signs that you might not be drinking enough.

How much water should you drink?

Nearly half of us don’t drink enough water! So grab a glass or water bottle as we look at how much you should be drinking, ways of keeping track and the signs that you might not be drinking enough.

How much water should I drink Each day?

Recommended daily allowances differ slightly around the world however the average adult should drink around 2 litres (70 oz.) of water each and every day. 

This is in addition to the water we get from our food which normally makes up around 20% of your recommend daily total. Find out how much water you should be drinking below.

The total recommended daily water intake for an average adult man is 2.5 litres (85 oz.) which includes the water we get from food.

We normally get around 20% of the water we need from the food we eat. This means you need to drink an additional 2L (70 oz.) of water every day in order to hit your target. If you skipped lunch or you’re currently reducing your calorie intake you might want to think about increasing this.

The total recommended daily water intake for an average adult woman is 2.0 litres (70 oz.) which includes the water we get from food.

We normally get around  around 20% of the water we need from the food we eat. This means you need to drink an additional 1.6L (54 oz.) of water every day in order to hit your target. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding it’s likely that you will need to increase your intake.

I think you’ll be surprised (possibly even shocked if you’re a parent) at just how much water children should be drinking. 

The total recommended daily intake for a boy aged 9-13 years is 2.1 litres (70 oz.). With 20% of that coming from food, they should be drinking 1.7L (75 oz.) of water every day – that’s only 300ml of water less than an adult man and more than an adult woman!

The total recommended daily intake for a girl aged 9-13 years is 1.9 litres (64 oz.). With 20% of that coming from food, they should be drinking 1.5L (51 oz.) of water every day – that’s only 100ml of water less than an adult woman!

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5 Simple ways to drink more water

I know it sounds easy but if you asked most people how much water they’ve had to drink today I’m pretty sure that they wouldn’t be able to tell you. Most people are just too busy, forget, or simply don’t keep track of it. Here are a few ideas to help you increase and keep track of the amount of water that you’re drinking.

1. Create a morning Routine

Before you do anything else in the morning make a habit of grabbing a glass of water. This could be fresh from the tap or warm with some lemon in. Not only does this get you well on your way to reaching your daily target but it also helps the body to rehydrate after you’ve been asleep. 

2. Get yourself a refillable water bottle

This is probably the easiest way of keeping track of how much water you’ve had to drink. Simply fill it up in the morning and if you have one with timings or motivational messages, you can easily keep track of your progress. Most people tend to prefer 946ml/32oz bottles as they are easy to carry and only need topping up once in the day. With loads of styles to choose from we’ve listed some of the most popular below.

3. Set a regular alarm

Chances are you’re either reading this on your phone or have it right next to you. Setting a reoccurring alarm every few hours can be a great way to remind you to get a drink. If you’ve been sat working or relaxing for a while it can also be a great reminder to stretch those legs.

4. download a hydration app

There are actually quite a few apps that can help you keep on top of your water intake. Some are free but watch out for in app purchases. If you’ve got some time then Healthline have pulled together a list of the top hydration apps and you can check those out here

5. Set yourself a challenge

Set yourself the challenge of drinking your recommended daily water intake for at least 21 days straight. Why 21 days? Well, research suggests that after three weeks the challenge should have become a habit and you’ll continue to do it for at least another 90 days!

Other drinks like tea and coffee count towards your total

Other drinks like tea and coffee count towards your total

Great news! You’re not stuck just drinking water as other beverages can count towards your daily intake. The key here though is to make sure you know what else is in those drinks – we don’t want too much caffeine or sugar. Beverages such as unsweetened tea and coffee or even soup, are all great ways to switch things up. My personal preference are the fruit infuser water bottles. The fruit adds a little taste and they just look so darn healthy!

Drinks that contain a lot of sugar or artificial sweeteners such as soda and energy drinks can certainly serve a purpose. However, they shouldn’t be seen as a way of increasing your water intake due to impact of all those other ingredients on your body.

The benefits of staying hydrated

Given that 60% of your body is made up of water it will come as no surprise that regular water intake is essential. What isn’t as widely known however are the added benefits of making sure that you stay hydrated.

  1. Your heart, brain and kidneys all tend to function better
  2. It feels like you have more energy and are not as fatigued
  3. Assists with ensuring regular bowel moments
  4. Helps to ease joint pain by flushing out toxins and helping to prevent gout
  5. Regular water intake can even help you lose weight. Drinking regular amounts can help make sure your stomach doesn’t feel as empty reducing the temptation to snack. Make sure you don’t overdo it though as any excessive drinking can lead to over-hydration. Yes that’s a thing!

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WHAT CAN IMPACT HOW MUCH WATER
You SHOULD DRINK EVERY DAY?

Although the recommended daily water intake can vary between health professionals, pretty much everyone agrees on when you should drink more. In most of these cases your body will let you know and you’ll feel more thirsty than normal, but that could be a sign that you’re already dehydrated. It really is important that you monitor your water intake more closely if you’re undertaking or are impacted by any of the factors below.

1. Physical Activity

If you’re undertaking any form of physical activity your body will sweat in order to help regulate your core temperature. Drinking additional water before, during and after exercise or other physical exertions can help to ensure you stay hydrated

2. Hot weather & warm environments

Similar to the above although this can sneak up on you a little. It’s common to feel thirsty in hot weather but by this time your body is potentially already slightly dehydrated. It’s sensible to drink regular amounts throughout the day and when the weather is warm make sure to either increase the frequency or volume of water.

3. Pregnancy & breast feeding

As we previously mentioned, during pregnancy and whilst breast feeding it is important to increase your daily water intake. Not only is your body having to work harder than normal but breast milk is made up of more than 80% water and so your body needs those extra fluids. If you’re in any doubt always make sure to consult your doctor.

4. Suffering from Diarrhea

It might seem slightly counterintuitive that loose watery stool means you need to drink more water but that is most certainly the case. You can quickly become dehydrated when suffering from diarrhea as you’re losing a lot of water that your body would normally have made good use of. 

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Signs that you're not drinking enough water

There are more signs to look out for than just feeling thirsty when it comes to being dehydrated. These are intended as a guide and if you have any health concerns you should always speak to a doctor.

  1. Bad breath; a dry mouth and dry lips can all be signs that you’re not drinking enough water
  2. Your pee is dark yellow or strong-smelling
  3. Lack of energy and feeling lethargic
  4. Feeling lightheaded or dizzy
  5. Peeing fewer than around 4 times per day
Caffeine and other diuretics like some medication as well as conditions such as diabetes can all make you more susceptible to dehydration.